Indiana woman, girlfriend used marijuana as incentive for boy’s behavior, court records show

An Indiana woman and her girlfriend gave her son marijuana dozens of times in the last three months as a reward for the boy’s good behavior, court records stated.

Susan Glascock and Melissa Burton, both 36, were charged with child neglect after the boy told police he was being rewarded with marijuana for his good behavior and had the drug taken away when he was behaving badly, FOX59 reported.

Police began investigating the family on June 25 when officers responded to a disturbance at the home in Greenfield. Glascock was upset about the amount of money the boy and his mother, Burton, was receiving by selling video games, court documents stated.

CALIFORNIA MOM FOUND AFTER FLEEING HOSPITAL WITH BABY WHEN CHILD TESTED POSITIVE FOR DRUGS, POLICE SAY

The boy attempted to intervene during an argument between the two women when Glascock pushed him to the ground and pinned him down.

The boy escaped and punched Glascock before running away, according to the report.

The boy’s grandfather later spoke to police and said his grandson was “in a terrible living condition and needed to be removed.” He added the boy had drugs given to him.

The boy told police he was given marijuana when he “did something good” or “ground him from marijuana” when he misbehaved. The couple also taught him out to roll a joint, court documents stated.

Burton’s son said he was given marijuana at least 50 times in the last three months. The women also admitted to giving the boy marijuana.

The women were arrest and later released on $1,000 bond each. Glascock also faces a battery charge.

Katherine Lam is a breaking and trending news digital producer for Fox News. Follow her on Twitter at @bykatherinelam

California mom found after fleeing hospital with baby when child tested positive for drugs, police say

A California mother was found Friday night after she fled a hospital with her baby when the child tested positive for drugs, police said.

Tina Baiz, 38, and her two children were found near a motel in Linda, Calif., FOX40 reported. The Yuba City mother went missing on July 4 after bringing her 11-month-old baby Zeke to the Hideout Hospital because of a medical emergency.

“We believe Tina may have overheard a conversation outside of the room discussing the positive result the child had for drugs in his system,” Yuba City police spokeswoman Shawna Pavey told FOX40.

Baiz had left the hospital while the baby still had an IV inserted. It’s unclear what type of drug was found in Zeke’s body.

Baiz was questioned by police and will likely face charges.

“We need to know exactly what has happened with Zeke and Zoe since the time she left Rideout Hospital until we found her this afternoon,” Pavey said, who also thanked the public’s help for locating Baiz and the two children.

It’s unclear what the children’s condition were when authorities located them.

Katherine Lam is a breaking and trending news digital producer for Fox News. Follow her on Twitter at @bykatherinelam

Major Chicago freeway shut down by anti-violence protesters

Thousands of anti-violence protesters have shut down lanes on a major Chicago highway as part of a movement to increase pressure on public officials to address the gun violence that has claimed hundreds of lives in the city.

The Dan Ryan Expressway — a freeway that incorporates portions of Interstates 90 and 94 — was chosen for its historical significance, having been a symbol of racial segregation in the 1960s. ABC 7 Chicago reported that workers closed lanes on the highway but kept the left lanes open while the protesters marched. Video showed traffic moving slowly on the highway.

Gov. Bruce Rauner’s office said in a statement that a marcher who ignored the boundaries would be arrested and face prosecution.

Chicago police said the city saw 252 homicides and 1,100 shootings in the first six months of this year, a decrease from the same period last year. But those crimes have been heavily concentrated in predominantly black, low-income neighborhoods.

“When people keep ignoring you, you take it up a notch. … We are going to continue to take it up a notch until we get responses.”

– The Rev. Michael Pfleger

TENNESSEE WOMAN BITTEN BY BROWN RECLUSE SPIDER ALLEGEDLY FINDS DOZENS MORE IN APARTMENT

The Rev. Michael Pfleger, a Roman Catholic priest and anti-violence activist on the city’s South Side who will lead Saturday’s march, said the protesters will carry a banner with a list of demands. They include: more resources, jobs, better schools and stronger gun laws — things Pfleger says they’ve been seeking for years.

“When people keep ignoring you, you take it up a notch,” Pfleger said. “We are going to continue to take it up a notch until we get responses.”

Pfleger and the Rev. Jesse Jackson, who’s also leading the protest, argue they’ve already tried marching through neighborhood streets, outside churches and along downtown’s Michigan Avenue, and that nothing has changed.

Jackson said the city still has “ghetto borders” — real or imagined — designed to keep “guns and drugs in and jobs and schools out.”

AIRMAN SENTENCED TO JAIL FOR RAPING RUNAWAY 14-YEAR-OLD GIRL

Katherine Pisabaj told ABC 7 Chicago she was victim of gun violence and was marching in the protest.

“Everybody is affected and it shouldn’t be. That’s why I am glad that we’re all here, that we’re all trying to make a difference and that’s what matters. Hopefully the people in power listen to us so that everything can change and my nephews can grow up in a world that they don’t have to worry about experiencing a pain that I did,” she said.

Officers from Illinois State police and the Chicago Police Department would be at the scene to ensure safety.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Bradford Betz is an editor for Fox News. Follow him on Twitter @bradford_betz.

Firefighters battle to contain wildfires sweeping through California

Firefighters in California battled Saturday to contain wildfires that have torched hundreds of homes and forced evacuations amid a record-setting heat wave.

The latest destructive fire burned at least 20 homes and threatened hundreds more in the hills above Goleta in Santa Barbara County.

Mandatory evacuations were ordered for about 3,000 people as the fire edged into residential areas.

In this photo released Friday, July 6, 2018, by the California Highway Patrol, the Klamathon Fire burns in Hornbrook, Calif. A local California official says a deadly blaze burning near the Oregon border moved swiftly through the rural area that is home to many retirees. Siskiyou County Board of Supervisors chair Ray Haupt says the blaze moved so fast it quickly reached Hornbrook, a community of about 250 people about 14 miles (22 kilometers) south of the Oregon border. Authorities said one person was killed in the fire. (California Highway Patrol via AP)

Photo released Friday, the Klamathon Fire burns in Hornbrook, California.

 (California Highway Patrol via AP)

The blaze, fueled by gusty winds, started with a house fire.

Several other wildfires are burning in Southern California.

In the foothills not far from San Diego, hundreds of residents fled the West Willows community near Alpine, The Los Angeles Times reported. Some of those who fled said they didn’t know whether their homes were still standing

East of Los Angeles in the San Bernardino National Forest, authorities ordered the evacuation of the community of Forest Falls, which has about 700 homes, as a quick-moving wildfire swelled to 1,000 acres.

In San Diego County, several fires erupted including one that burned at least five homes and perhaps many more in Alpine, in foothills not far from San Diego. Gov. Jerry Brown declared a state of emergency for the county.

At a Red Cross shelter, Ben Stanfill told the San Diego Union-Tribune that he and other relatives helped evacuate his mother’s house, even though it wasn’t in a mandatory evacuation area.

“We just grabbed everything you can’t replace or re-buy,” Stanfill said. “My grandma’s photographs, the cat, my sister’s Mickey Mouse teddy bear she’s had since she was little.”

The fire was only 5 percent contained Friday night, but crews had virtually stopped its growth and were focusing on knocking down hotspots that continue to threatened houses and mobile homes, state fire officials said.

Another fire on the Camp Pendleton Marine base prompted the evacuation of 750 homes.

Firefighters battle flames at the Alpine Oaks Estates mobile home park during a widfire Friday, July 6, 2018, in Alpine, Calif. Gusty winds fanned the flames as Southern California struggles through a scorching heat wave. (Eduardo Contreras/The San Diego Union-Tribune via AP)

Firefighters battle flames at the Alpine Oaks Estates mobile home park during a wildfire Friday in Alpine, California.

 (Eduardo Contreras/The San Diego Union-Tribune via AP)

The fires burned as temperatures in some places in California hit triple-digits.

Downtown Los Angeles set a record for July 6 when temperatures reached 95 degrees in the morning and then climbed to 106 degrees shortly before 3 p.m., Reuters reported.

Authorities said that crews fighting a fast-moving Northern California wildfire on Friday discovered the charred remains of a person apparently caught in the flames, Reuters reported.

“We don’t even have an address because of the devastation around the area,” Siskiyou County sheriff’s Lt. Jeremiah LaRue told the San Francisco Chronicle.

He said authorites aren’t expecting to find any more bodies.

“We’re actually pretty hopeful everyone got out,” LaRue said. “We’ve been talking to people who evacuated, and no one’s missing right now, so that’s good.”

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Tom Shillue: What being a Toys R Us kid really means

Americans are sadly saying goodbye to Geoffrey the Giraffe and Toys R Us, because the retailer has just finished closing its 735 stores across the country and has gone out of business.

The photo of Geoffrey the Giraffe walking an empty aisle with a suitcase in tow heading off to a “very long vacation” touched the hearts of many.

The photo has gone viral and was passed from one mobile device to another, ironically using the very technology that has made life so difficult for many traditional retailers like Toys R Us. These days, people can buy a toy with one click on their phone and have it on their doorstep in 48 hours or less.

I remember the Toys R Us TV jingle from the 1980s, but I was not really a “Toys R Us kid.” I was from the generation before – we had the Sears Wish Book, a telephone-directory-sized colorful catalogue of everything under the sun.

While it may be sad to see this company close its doors, the magic of childhood will live on…

I would pour over its pages full of photos of happy kids playing with toys, games and sports equipment and circle item after item in red marker. “Wish” was the right word for it – I don’t remember my parents ever buying anything from that catalogue.

Sometimes on Christmas Eve I would leave a page open as a hint for Santa, which I knew was a long shot, because I think at that late hour Santa had already made up his mind about what I was going to get.

Along with the heart-wrenching photo of Geoffrey, the company posted this message on its website:

“Thanks to each of you who shared your amazing journey to (and through) parenthood with us, and to every grandparent, aunt, uncle, brother and sister who’s built a couch-cushion rocket ship, made up a hero adventure, or invented something gooey. Promise us just this one thing: Don’t ever grow up. Play on!”

A great message – and very true – because kids don’t really need toy stores to have fun and create their own adventures. And while it may be sad to see this company close its doors, the magic of childhood will live on, whether you shop in a store, or on the Internet, or even if you just make your own fun out of a bunch of couch cushions. Play on!

Tom Shillue is host of The Tom Shillue Show, live Monday-Friday 3 to 6 PM ET, featuring comedic insight and analysis on the days trending topics as well as interviews with special guests. Shillue is a stand-up comedian and former host of FNC’s Red Eye, he joined FOX News Channel in 2015 and remains a contributor to the network.

Milwaukee Brewers honor military veterans with Fourth of July ceremony

The Milwaukee Brewers honored military veterans in a Fourth of July ceremony Wednesday ahead of a win over the Minnesota Twins.

The Brewers, in association with the Stars & Stripes Honor Flight organization, gave 25 veterans a “Tour of Honor,” complete with special Brewers jerseys with the vets’ names on the back.

brewers veteran1

The veterans were part of the Stars & Stripes Honor Flight organization.

 (Dani Mejchar)

“The Milwaukee Brewers are committed to honoring those who sacrificed so much to defend our country through their service,” Brewers COO Rick Schlesinger said in a statement.

brewers veteran4

A veteran stands next to Brewers player Nate Orf.

 (Dani Mejchar)

The honor flight takes World War II, Korean and Vietnam War veterans to Washington to see the memorials, according to Milwaukee Journal Sentinel.

Veterans from the U.S. Army, U.S. Navy, U.S. Marines, U.S. Army Air Corps and U.S. Air Force all participated in the ceremony. The full list of participants can be seen here.

Ryan Gaydos is an editor for Fox News. Follow him on Twitter @RyanGaydos.

The Latest: Huge Colorado fire keeps 2,500 homes evacuated

The Latest on wildfires burning in the Western United States (all times local):

9:20 a.m.

More than 2,500 homes in Colorado are under evacuation orders as firefighters battle more than a half dozen wildfires around the state.

Most of the evacuations in effect Monday were due to a 78-square-mile (202-square-kilometer) wildfire in southern Colorado that authorities believe was human-caused.

The Costilla County Sheriff’s Office says 52-year-old Jesper Joergensen of Denmark was arrested on arson charges. Investigators haven’t released other details except to say they don’t think he intentionally started the fire.

Immigration officials have requested that they be allowed to take custody of him if he’s released from jail.

About 570 homes are evacuated near a 2-square-mile (6-square-kilometer) fire that started Friday west of Colorado Springs. About 360 children at a camp also had to be evacuated by the Chateau Fire.

___

9:20 a.m.

Firefighters trying to contain a wildfire burning in southern Wyoming are facing warm and dry weather.

About 150 firefighters are battling the fire burning in the Medicine Bow National Forest near the Colorado border. The fire has burned about 33 square miles (85 square kilometers) since it started June 10.

The fire is about 80 percent contained but it has flared up in the last week, prompting authorities to advise some residents in the area to prepare for evacuation.

But all major highways in the area are open Monday. The cause of the fire remains under investigation.

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8:50 a.m.

A wildfire burning in hot and dry conditions in Utah has forced the evacuations of a handful of seasonal cabins near a popular fishing reservoir.

Jason Curry of the Utah Division of Forest, Fire and State Lands said Monday that the fire has scorched about 10 square miles (28 square kilometers) near Strawberry Reservoir.

Curry says the blaze about 80 miles (129 kilometers) southeast of Salt Lake City started Sunday and officials believe it was human-caused but are investigating.

The fire is threatening about seven to 10 cabins that are used as seasonal homes, not primary residences.

He says the fire is expected to grow with hot and dry conditions forecast for Monday. Similar weather is fueling blazes in several Western states.

___

8:50 a.m.

Officials say a wildfire in Northern California grew dramatically overnight and is largely burning out of control.

The California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection says the fire northwest of Sacramento scorched at least 70 square miles (180 square kilometers) by Monday morning.

It is threatening 100 buildings and has forced evacuations. It grew from 55 square miles (142 square kilometers) reported Sunday night and is just 3 percent contained.

Cal Fire says strong winds, high temperatures and low humidity are fueling the blaze.

No injuries were reported and the exact number of people evacuated was unclear. Smoke and ash are contributing to poor air quality in the San Francisco Bay Area and California wine country.

Hot, dry conditions are fueling blazes in several Western states.

___

7:55 a.m.

Hot winds fueling a massive wildfire that prompted evacuations in rural Northern California have pushed the flames into three counties.

The California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection said Monday that the blaze that ignited Saturday in western Yolo County spread over the weekend to neighboring Lake and Napa counties.

The fast-moving fire has scorched at least 55 square miles (142 square kilometers) of dry brush and threatened more than 100 buildings in ranchland northwest of Sacramento.

No injuries were reported and the exact number of people evacuated was unclear. Smoke and ash are contributing to poor air quality in the San Francisco Bay Area and California wine country.

It comes as hot, dry conditions are fueling blazes in several Western states.

Former ICE chief counsel sentenced to prison for stealing identities of illegal immigrants

A former top U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement attorney has been sentenced to four years in prison in an identity theft case that victimized illegal immigrants facing deportation.

Raphael Sanchez, 44, ran up credit card and other bills totaling more than $190,000 in the names of his seven victims and carried out the scheme over a four-year period while serving as chief counsel of the ICE Seattle office, overseeing deportations in Alaska, Idaho, Oregon and Washington.

“Sanchez was entrusted with significant authority to represent the United States in crucial immigration proceedings that deeply shaped the lives of many,” prosecutors told the judge in court papers. “Sanchez abandoned the principles he swore to uphold and used his authority merely as a vehicle for personal profit.”

Sanchez, who earned $162,000 a year, agreed to the sentence as part of a plea deal in February in which he admitted guilt to wire fraud and aggravated identity theft charges.

SEATTLE ICE ATTORNEY ADMITS TO STEALING IMMIGRANT IDS

“The career that was my life is gone,” Sanchez said at the sentencing Thursday in Seattle Federal Court, according to The Seattle Times.

His attorney said Sanchez “made choices that sabotaged everything good in his life” and stole money he didn’t really need to buy things he didn’t really want.

During a pre-sentence interview with court officials, Sanchez said he struggled with money problems, depression, fatigue and a failed relationship before launching into his scheme.

“It became a perfect storm that did not allow me to see the hurtfulness and wrongfulness of my actions,” he said.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

 

 

The Latest: Shooter had an escape plan he never implemented

The Latest on the shootings targeting Maryland’s Capital Gazette newspaper (all times local):

12:10 p.m.

A prosecutor says the shooter who opened fire at a Maryland newspaper had an escape plan he never implemented.

The suspect was captured by police while hiding under a desk at the Capital Gazette newspaper in Annapolis.

Prosecutor Wes Adams did not give any details about the escape plan. He said Friday that there were two entrances to the newspaper’s office. He says 38-year-old Jarrod W. Ramos entered through the front door on Thursday and “worked his way through the office.” He says Ramos barricaded the exit door so employees couldn’t escape, and that one of the five people who were killed was shot while trying to escape out that exit.

A judge ordered Ramos to remain detained during a court hearing Friday. Judge Thomas Pryal said found a likelihood that Ramos is a danger.

Ramos appeared at the hearing via video feed. He appeared to watch attentively during the hearing but never spoke. He was represented by public defender William Davis.

He is charged with five counts of first-degree murder.

___

11:45 a.m.

Authorities say the Maryland newspaper targeted in a shooting attack that left five people dead didn’t want to press charges in an earlier case.

Police Chief Timothy Altomare said at a news conference Friday that the Capital Gazette didn’t press charges over social media threats the shooting suspect had made against the newspaper in 2013.

Authorities have charged Jarrod W. Ramos with five counts of first-degree murder in the killings inside Maryland’s Capital Gazette office on Thursday.

Altomare said the shooter intended to “kill as many people as he could kill.”

___

11:30 a.m.

Authorities say the suspect in the deadly shooting at a Maryland newspaper used a pump-action shotgun in the attack at the Capital Gazette newspaper that left five people dead.

Police Chief Timothy Altomare also said at a news conference Friday that it is “absolutely untrue” that suspect Jarrod W. Ramos mutilated his fingertips.

Altomare also said that employees Rachel Pacella and Janet Cooley had been treated at a hospital and released after being injured during Thursday’s attack.

___

10 a.m.

The city of Annapolis is planning a vigil for the victims of a mass shooting at the Capital Gazette newspaper.

The city announced on social media Friday that the vigil would begin at 8 p.m. at a public square near the Capitol, followed by a march to a dock for a service by the water.

The Episcopal Diocese of Maryland announced that the city’s houses of worship had planned a prayer vigil at 7 p.m. Friday at a mall across the street from the shooting site. All are welcome.

On Saturday, the 5:30 p.m. Eucharist at St. Anne’s Episcopal Church in downtown will be offered for the victims.

___

9:30 a.m.

A Maryland newspaper attacked by a gunman has kept its promise to put out the next day’s paper, despite the shooting deaths of five people in its newsroom.

Hours after a gunman blasted his way inside The Capital Gazette on Thursday, the surviving staff tweeted out their defiance: “Tomorrow, this Capital page will return to its steady purpose of offering readers informed opinion about the world around them. But today, we are speechless.”

Friday morning’s edition featured in-depth coverage of the shooting and obituaries of the five people killed. Each victim’s photo appeared below the masthead.

And below the main shooting story were the staples of a community newspaper: a glance at the day’s weather and a teaser to a national story inside: “Trump, Putin: The two leaders will meet in Finland in July.”

__

9 a.m.

Court documents say a gunman who fatally shot five people at a Maryland newspaper tried to hide under a desk after the attack until police arrived.

A statement of probable cause obtained Friday by The Associated Press says surveillance video captured Thursday’s events at the Capital Gazette. It says Jarrod Ramos entered the newspaper’s office around 2:30 p.m.

The statement says Ramos used a “long gun firearm” and shot out the business doors, then shot people he encountered inside, killing five.

The statement says Ramos then “attempted to conceal himself under a desk” until police arrived and located him.

Ramos was in custody Friday and scheduled for a bond hearing at 10:30 a.m.

A spokeswoman for the Office of the Public Defender said the Anne Arundel office would be representing Ramos. She declined comment.

___

5:50 a.m.

Court records filed Friday show Jarrod W. Ramos has been charged with five counts of first-degree murder in the killings inside Maryland’s Capital Gazette office.

The online records do not list an attorney for Ramos, who is scheduled for a bail hearing 10:30 a.m. Friday in Annapolis.

Authorities say Ramos opened fire inside the newspaper office Thursday, killing five and injuring two others. He had a long, acrimonious history with the newspaper, including a lawsuit and years of harassment of its journalists.

___

12: 30 a.m.

Police say a man firing a shotgun killed four journalists and a staffer at Maryland’s capital newspaper before officers quickly arrived and took him into custody.

Police say they are a questioning the suspect, a white man in his late 30s, following Thursday’s attack on The Capital Gazette in Annapolis.

Acting Police Chief William Krampf of Anne Arundel County says it was a targeted attack in which the gunman “looked for his victims.”

Journalists described how they scrambled under desks and sought to hide during a few minutes of terror. They recounted hearing the gunman’s footsteps as he moved about the newsroom, firing his weapon.

The attack came amid months of verbal and online attacks on the “fake news media” from politicians and others from President Donald Trump on down.

Capital Gazette shooting suspect barricaded door, preventing staffers from escaping rampage

The Capital Gazette killer barricaded an exit door and shot at least one fleeing victim during his brief but bloody rampage at the Maryland newspaper Thursday, a prosecutor said.

Jarrod Warren Ramos, 38, has been charged in the murder of five staffers at the paper.

Wes Adams, a Maryland prosecutor, said Friday one person tried to escape the terror but was thwarted by Ramos.

Jarrod ramos

Jarrod W. Ramos, 38, was charged with five counts of first-degree murder on Friday.

 (Anne Arundel Co. Dept. of Detention Facilities)

“There was one victim that attempted to escape through the back door and was shot,” Adams said.

The prosecutor said Ramos “entered through the front door and worked his way through the office, where he shot victims as he walked through the office.” 

Police said Ramos explicitly targeted the newspaper. On Friday, a judge ordered Ramos held without bond pending a trial. Earlier on Friday, Ramos was charged with five counts of first-degree murder.

Ramos appeared before Judge Thomas Pryal on Friday wearing a green detention suit in a video court appearance. The suspect said nothing but watched attentively, the Associated Press reported. Authorities have described the suspect as being uncooperative.

In this June 28 2018 photo released by the Anne Arundel Police, Jarrod Warren Ramos poses for a photo, in Annapolis, Md. First-degree murder charges were filed Friday against Ramos who police said targeted Maryland's capital newspaper, shooting his way into the newsroom and killing four journalists and a staffer before officers swiftly arrested him. (Anne Arundel Police via AP)

Jarrod Warren Ramos was ordered held without bond pending a trial on Friday, June 29, 2018.

 (Anne Arundel Police via AP)

Adams said the judge’s finding that Ramos was a danger to society is justified because of evidence that he carefully planned the attack barricading the back door so victims couldn’t escape, before using “a tactical approach in hunting down and shooting the innocent people.”

The five Gazette staffers killed in the attack were identified as Wendi Winters, John McNamara, Gerald Fischman, Rebecca Smith, and Rob Hiaasen. Two other employees, Rachel Pacella and Janet Cooley were injured in the attack and treated at a hospital before being released.

Winters was the special publications editor. McNamara was a writer. Fischman was editorial page editor. Smith was a sales assistant. Hiaasen was an assistant editor and columnist.

Police held a final press conference on the shooting on Friday stating the suspect used a pump-action shotgun that he legally purchased about a year or so ago. The suspect was also carrying smoke grenades.

Anne Arundel County Chief Timothy Altomare said, “The fellow was there to kill as many people as he could.”

Altomare said authorities were not searching for any other suspects in connection with the shooting and said they had no reason to believe that anyone else was involved. Police obtained a search warrant at the suspect’s apartment and found evidence that showed the “origination of planning.” Altomare said he believed the attack was planned. He said investigators did not find a written manifesto in the residence.

Crime scene tape surrounds a building housing The Capital Gazette newspaper's offices, Friday, June 29, 2018, in Annapolis, Md. A man armed with smoke grenades and a shotgun attacked journalists in the building Thursday, killing several people before police quickly stormed the building and arrested him, police and witnesses said. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)

Crime scene tape surrounds a building housing The Capital Gazette newspaper’s offices on Friday, June 29, 2018, in Annapolis, Md.

 (AP)

Altomare said investigators were able to identify the suspect using quickly with help of facial recognition technology from the Maryland Image Repository System. The chief refused to say the suspect’s name, refusing to give him the satisfaction of identifying him by name.

The chief said the Capital Gazette declined to press charges against Ramos over social media threat he made against the newspaper in 2013. Further details were not immediately available.

Altomare said some 300 law enforcement officers from different agencies were on the scene that day to help capture the suspect who was found hiding under a desk at the officer.

“Every cop from all those agencies was a part of how we saved these people’s lives yesterday, I thank you from the bottom of my heart,” Altomare said.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Kathleen Joyce is a breaking/trending news producer for FoxNews.com. You can follow her at @Kathleen_Joyce8 on Twitter.

Man allegedly breaks into woman’s home twice, rapes her, found waiting in victim’s bed: cops

A Tennessee man is behind bars after he allegedly broke into a woman’s home twice, raped her, before breaking in a third time to wait for her in bed after she went to the hospital, police say.

Charles Turner, of Memphis, allegedly broke into the woman’s home through her bedroom window. When she arrived home, he allegedly threw her on the ground and attacked her with a mop, WREG reported.

Turner reportedly fled the house and the victim called 911 for help.

A few hours later, Turner reportedly broke into the house again and attacked the victim.

Police said the victim was lying in bed when he entered the home through the same broken window. He allegedly choked her, punched her in the face and forced himself on her.

The woman was able to break free from his hold by grabbing Turner’s private parts. However, the attack didn’t end there.

The woman fled outside and Turner allegedly followed her, grabbed her and shoved her to the ground before hitting her again.

Turner eventually fled again and the victim called for help.

After receiving treatment at a local hospital, the victim returned home and allegedly found Turner laying on her bed waiting for her return.

Turner was finally taken into custody and charged with aggravated rape, aggravated burglary and aggravated assault, the station reported.

Immigration lawyer trying to reunite mother, child claims ICE agent shoved her

A Kansas City, Mo., lawyer claims an agent from U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement shoved her to the ground Tuesday morning while she was trying to reunite a 3-year-old boy with his Honduran mother before the mother and child were deported.

The lawyer, Andrea Martinez, told the Kansas City Star that the altercation outside ICE’s Enforcement and Removal Operations office in Kansas City left her with a fractured right foot, and a bloodied left ankle and knee. She added that the agent physically separated the boy, Noah, from her, the report said.

ICE released a statement to FOX 4, saying it takes the allegations “very seriously” and was looking into the matter.

Noah was previously separated from his mother, Kenia Bautistia-Mayorga, 23, while she spent more than a month in Platte County Jail in Missouri. Bautistia-Mayorga, an undocumented immigrant, is currently six months pregnant, according to the Star.

The baby’s father, Luis Alfredo Diaz Inestroza, also an undocumented immigrant from Honduras, looked after the boy while the mother was in jail.

On Tuesday, the father accompanied Noah to say goodbye before the mother and child were deported, but his status made him a target for detainment, Martinez told the Star. She said the ICE agent pulled the father and Noah inside the center office while she waited outside.

A few minutes later, she said she was allowed in the building. She said Noah and his mother were crying and hugging. The father was detained and sent to a central Missouri jail, where he was being held without bond.

Bautisa-Mayorga was reportedly taken into custody in February 2016 for illegally crossing the Texas border. A judge released her on her own recognizance but she did not attend the hearing.

Since then, Bautisa-Mayorga and her son have been living with Inestroza in Texas. They were detained after an officer pulled them over in May. Inestroza was told he had two months to leave the country.

Bradford Betz is an editor for Fox News. Follow him on Twitter @bradford_betz.

Man arrested after sprinkling cocaine on officer’s head, police say

A Tennessee man was arrested Monday after allegedly sprinkling cocaine over an officer’s head, police said.

Nashville police officers saw Antonio Freeman roll what appeared to be marijuana in a blunt, FOX17 Nashville reported, citing an arrest affidavit. When an officer approached Freeman, police said he tried to hide the blunt he was rolling.

Freeman, 20, put the rolling papers and marijuana in his pocket and, in front of three officers, took out a bag of cocaine and began to sprinkle the power on Officer Ryan Caulfield’s head, The Tennessean reported.

Freeman was arrested and police seized 2.5 grams of cocaine that he allegedly tried to destroy, according to FOX17 Nashville. Police said they also discovered a scale and a pill bottle with marijuana residue behind the man’s scrotum, according to the station.

He was arrested on felony drug and tampering charges and remained in Metro Nashville Police custody on $5,000 bond Tuesday.

Ryan Gaydos is an editor for Fox News. Follow him on Twitter @RyanGaydos.

Man accused of driving into crowd at Charlottesville rally, killing 1 person, charged with federal hate crimes

The man accused of mowing down a counter-protester at last year’s white nationalist rally in Charlottesville is now facing federal hate crime charges.

James Alex Fields Jr., a 21-year-old from Ohio, has been charged with one count of a hate crime resulting in the death of 28-year-old Heather Heyer. He also is facing 28 other hate crime charges involving attempts to kill others, according to an indictment released Wednesday, in addition to first-degree murder and other charges at the state level.

This is a developing story. Check back for updates.

‘Cowards’ placed boy, 7, underwater in bathtub as parents watch during home invasion, sheriff says

Authorities released new details after a Texas family was terrorized Monday by three masked intruders who placed a child underwater in a bathtub to force information out of his parents as they let out “chilling” screams in the background.

The Fort Bend County Sheriff’s Office said in a news release they received a call around 3 a.m. from the home the near the intersection of FM 1464 and the Westpark Toll Road in the Houston area of Fort Bend County.

The homeowner told police that three masked black suspects broke through the front door and pistol-whipped him, causing injuries. 

“This is the worst kind of crime against a family,” Sheriff Troy Nehls said. “Three crooks forcing their way into a home in the middle of the night is appalling. To make matters worse, they accosted a 7-year-old child. They’re cowards, to say the least.”

Texas Suspect 2

One of the suspects can be seen leading the couple’s 7-year-old son around the home looking for money.

 (FOX26)

Nehls said the father kept telling the intruders there was no money and to take jewelry or a car, but the masked men weren’t satisfied.

“That just didn’t sit well with the suspects in this case,” he said during a news conference Tuesday.

“The 7-year-old is having to watch his dad get tortured, basically. When that didn’t work they tortured the 7-year-old. To me, yesterday I said that’s pretty sick. I will add that is evil to do something like that to a child.”

– Detective Justin White

The men then turned their attention to the couple’s 7-year-old son, who was led around the house in search of money, according to the sheriff. Police released pictures of the three suspects in the home, including the moment one of the men tries to get the boy to locate where a large amount of money was stored.

“We have audio and video from inside that house,” Nehls said. “You can hear chilling screams from all the family members inside that house.”

One of the masked men later placed the 7-year-old son in a bath tub with hot water in an attempt to get information about possessions in the home.

“You can hear when the bathtub was filling with water,” Nehls said. “Then all of a sudden the screams became muffled because he’s just up underneath the water.” 

Texas Suspect 4

A second suspect in the violent home invasion can be seen on a surveillance camera.

 (FOX26)

Detective Justin White told reporters the boy was used as “leverage” by the suspects.

“The 7-year-old is having to watch his dad get tortured, basically,” he said Tuesday. “When that didn’t work they tortured the 7-year-old. To me, yesterday I said that’s pretty sick. I will add that is evil to do something like that to a child.” 

Nehls said the boy was transported to Texas Medical Center and was being treated for having some fluids in his lungs. He also said while the bathtub water was hot, it was not enough to cause burns to the boy.

MASKED MEN TERRORIZE TEXAS FAMILY DURING HOME INVASION, OFFICIALS SAY

The three men left with cash, jewelry and also took the family’s phones after the hour-long ordeal, according to police. The homeowner was a small-business owner and had a large amount of cash in the house, according to Nehls, who did not go into further details.

Texas Suspect 5

The entire ordeal lasted about an hour, according to police.

 (FOX26)

While police have not identified the victims, Mohamad Ghiri told KPRC on Monday he thought his brother was just late for work but finally in person was able to see the horror his face and description of the terrifying incident.

“I saw him all bloody and a gash on his head,” Ghriri told KRPC. “He was shaken up, I tried to calm him down but he was just worried about his son.”

Anyone who has information is asked to call Fort Bend County Crime Stoppers, Inc. at (281) 342-TIPS (8477) or submit a tip online at www.fortbend.crimestoppersweb.com.

“I’ve never seen anyone in my career ever use a child for information,” the sheriff said Tuesday. “We need to get them off the streets.” 

Travis Fedschun is a reporter for FoxNews.com. Follow him on Twitter @travfed

Immigrant child removed from mural near Brown v. Board site

The image of an immigrant child clinging to her mother has been removed from a mural near the Brown v. Board of Education National Historic site in Topeka.

Michael Toombs, the artistic director overseeing the project, said “we all have been touched by what is happening to our children” and initially was going to leave the image that artist bj McBride painted in protest of the separation of parents and children arrested at the U.S. border. But Toombs said he painted over the clinging child Monday because “this was not the place.” The 130- by 30-foot (40- by 9-meter) mural tells the story of the U.S. Supreme Court ruling that ended segregated education and faces a former all-black school in Topeka where the lead plaintiff’s child was a student, The Kansas City Star reports.

“I could see the way things were starting to germinate in the media that the story was becoming more about the addition than about all the good creative community labor that it took to create the mural,” Toombs said.

McBride said she “spontaneously” painted the child Friday and wasn’t opposed to removing the image, which she later decided was “distracting.”

“In a collaborative effort, any time the spotlight is put on one artist it is not good,” McBride said. “I don’t have any issue in celebrating all the artists and keeping the focus on what we came there to do.”

Sarah Fizell, executive director of the nonprofit ArtsConnect behind the mural, said the clinging child didn’t fit with the mission of the mural, which was was three years in the making. About 30 professional artists worked with children to paint the mural, and members of the public were invited to paint a portion as well. In all, about 2,000 people participated, including visitors from all over the world.

The mural is expected to be completed by the end of the week and celebrated by a community event that will feature a time lapse video of its creation, including a shot showing the mural with the clinging child followed by one with the child painted over.

___

Information from: The Kansas City Star, http://www.kcstar.com

Latest: US official: Fort Bliss to house detained families

The Latest on the separation of immigrant children from their parents (all times local):

10 p.m.

A federal official says the U.S. Army post Fort Bliss in El Paso will house families detained after crossing the U.S.-Mexico border illegally.

The official was not authorized to discuss the plans and spoke to The Associated Press on condition of anonymity.

The official says Goodfellow Air Force Base will be used for housing for detained unaccompanied children. Goodfellow is located in the central Texas city of San Angelo.

Earlier Monday, White House Press Secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders insisted that the Trump administration’s reversal in referring parents crossing the border illegally with children for prosecution is only temporary because the government is running out of resources.

Sanders spoke to reporters after the head of U.S. Customs and Border Protection said he has stopped referring cases involving children for prosecution.

__

Associated Press writer Lolita C. Baldor contributed to this report.

___

4:45 p.m.

After learning of separated migrant families at the U.S-Mexico border, a 6-year-old girl from Atlanta wanted to help.

Armed with lemonade, the girl went to work raising funds Sunday. His mother, Shannon Cofrin Gaggero, set a broad goal of $1,000, the Atlanta Journal-Constitution reports. After the first day, they raised more than $1,100.

Now —from the virtual fundraiser and physical lemonade stand— a total of more than $13,000 has been raised. More than 200 donations have rolled in for the Gaggeros family’s cause.

Proceeds will benefit the Refugee and Immigrant Center for Education and Legal Service, a nonprofit in Texas that offers free and low-cost legal services to immigrants.

Upon learning of separated families, many people in the U.S. raised money to help them. One Silicon Valley couple has raised more than $20 million.

___

4:15 p.m.

A group of mothers and fathers who were separated from their children after crossing the U.S.-Mexico border broke down in tears as they talked about the uncertainties of being reunited with their sons and daughters.

The five parents were among 32 who had been released from federal custody to the care of a Texas charitable organization in El Paso, Texas.

Speaking Spanish and all wearing ankle monitors, the parents told reporters during a news conference Monday that they don’t know when they might see their children again.

One mother from Guatemala was able to talk with a social worker in New York where her 4-year-old son was taken.

When she asked to speak with the boy, the social worker told her the child was angry and didn’t want to talk with her because he believed his mother had abandoned him.

The woman said she would not have come to the U.S. had she known her child would be taken from her.

___

3 p.m.

Legislation asking Louisiana Gov. John Bel Edwards to recall National Guard troops at the border until families who entered illegally are reunited with their children has fizzled.

New Orleans Democratic Sen. J.P. Morrell didn’t bring the measure up for Senate consideration before the special session adjourned Sunday night, amid a lack of support for it.

Louisiana has a three-person National Guard team and one helicopter at the Texas border. Edwards, a Democrat, decided the team will remain until mid-July as planned.

He says the crew had no role in separating families, a policy the Trump administration enacted and then reversed.

___

2:45 p.m.

Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker has repeatedly dodged questions about whether he supported President Donald Trump’s immigration policy at the Mexican border, saying it’s outside of his jurisdiction.

The Republican Walker skirted the issue Monday with reporters, declining to give an opinion.

Walker has frequently commented on immigration and other federal or international political issues, particularly in 2015 when he was running for president. Just over two months ago, Walker tweeted praise to Trump for “taking on illegal drugs, human trafficking, illegal firearms, and all the problems we see on our southern border.”

His re-election campaign is even paying for digital ads running on Facebook that voice support for sending National Guard troops to defend the southern border.

___

2:40 p.m.

New York state officials say they’re ready to provide social services to the estimated hundreds of immigrant children housed at New York foster-care facilities after being separated from their asylum-seeking parents.

Gov. Andrew Cuomo says Monday that state agencies can send public services providers to government-contracted foster care agencies that request help for children separated from parents after the families were caught crossing the southern border illegally.

The Democrat was joined at his Manhattan office by the heads of the state health and family services agencies and by immigrant advocates. He also announced that state services can be provided to children released to a foster family or to a relative living in New York state.

Cuomo has been highly critical of Republican President Donald Trump’s “zero tolerance” policy that results in the separation of asylum-seeking families.

___

2:30 p.m.

White House Press Secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders insists the administration’s reversal in referring parents crossing the border illegally with children for prosecution is only temporary because the government is running out of resources.

Sanders spoke to reporters at the White House after the head of U.S. Customs and Border Protection said he has stopped referring cases involving children for prosecution.

That’s after President Trump’s order that stopped the separation of children and their parents who cross the border illegally. Attorney General Jeff Sessions says the “no tolerance” policy is still in place, but there will be no one to prosecute without referrals.

Sanders says stopping the referrals is a temporary solution. She says it will only last a short amount of time because: “we’re going to run out of space, we’re going to run out of resources to keep people together.”

She called on Congress to change immigration laws.

___

1:50 p.m.

No arrests were made among protesters blocking a street outside a speech where U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions cast children at the nation’s southern border as victims of a broken immigration system.

Demonstrations outside the Peppermill hotel-casino were colorful, loud and peaceful.

An act of civil disobedience by more than 20 people who sat down in a crosswalk didn’t draw a police response.

Reno police Officer Travis Warren, a department spokesman, says officers only wanted to maintain safety, not arrest people.

Progressive Leadership Alliance of Nevada leader Bob Fulkerson says protesters got their point across.

Fulkerson calls separating children from families at the nation’s southern border an act of state-sponsored terror.

Sessions told a school safety conference it’s a difficult and frustrating situation.

The attorney general declared that more than 80 percent of the children crossing U.S. borders are “by themselves, without parents or guardians —often sent with a paid smuggler.”

_

1:40 p.m.

The head of U.S. Customs and Border Protection says an inability to process all asylum seekers at border crossings is temporary.

Commissioner Kevin McAleenan says the facilities were not built for such large numbers.

He says that some asylum seekers had to wait a day at four crossings, were turned away and told to return.

There are longer waits at San Diego’s San Ysidro crossing. He described it is an “outlier” with longer waits.

Asylum seekers who go to a specific border crossing are a different from the thousands of parents who were arrested crossing illegally with their children under a zero tolerance policy.

McAleenan says agents have temporarily stopped referring cases for criminal prosecution involving parents and children.

He says it’s because of President Trump’s order that called for children to stop being separated from their families.

___

1:35 p.m. Immigrant rights activists in Seattle are suing the Trump administration, saying it is unnecessarily prolonging the separation of asylum-seeking immigrants from their children.

The Northwest Immigrant Rights Project filed the lawsuit Monday in U.S. District Court in Seattle on behalf of three Central American migrants held in federal custody in Washington state, thousands of miles from where immigration officials have transferred their children. The lawsuit seeks class-action status on behalf of other immigrants separated from their children and detained in Washington state.

The organization says U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement has provided no information about whether or when the detainees’ asylum cases will move forward or when they’ll be reunited with their children.

Washington, California, New Jersey and at least eight other states have also announced plans to sue the administration over the separations this week.

___

1:25 p.m.

A federal judge in Portland ordered that immigration attorneys be given access to more than 120 asylum seekers being held at the federal prison in Oregon.

U.S. District Judge Michael Simon on Monday granted an emergency order sought by the American Civil Liberties Union and the Innovation Law Lab, a nonprofit whose attorneys have been denied access to immigrants being held at the prison in Sheridan.

U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement transferred the immigrants to Oregon because other holding facilities have been overloaded since the Trump administration enacted a “zero tolerance” policy involving people entering the U.S. illegally.

The detainees are from 16 countries, but more than half are from India and Nepal.

___

1:15 p.m.

Federal officials Monday ordered protesters to end their round-the-clock occupation of property outside the U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement office in Portland, Oregon.

Law enforcement officers began distributing notices to vacate late Monday morning. The several hundred protesters have so far ignored the demand.

The group rallying under the moniker Occupy ICE PDX wants to abolish ICE and end the Trump administration’s “zero tolerance” policy in which all unlawful border crossings are referred for prosecution.

Occupy ICE PDX last week called for similar occupations throughout the country, and demonstrators have responded in places such as New York, Los Angeles and Detroit.

Earlier Monday, federal law enforcement officers entered the Portland’s ICE headquarters to secure government property ahead of the vacate notice.

he protesters did not try to thwart officers.

Portland’s ICE headquarters has been the site of an occupation since June 17.

___

12:55 p.m.

The head of U.S. Customs and Border Protection says he has temporarily stopped referring for criminal prosecution adults who cross the border illegally with children.

Commissioner Kevin McAleenan told reporters in Texas Monday he ordered referrals suspended within hours of President Trump’s executive order last week that stopped the practice of separating families.

He says that the zero tolerance policy remains in effect, but cases cannot be prosecuted because parents cannot be separated from their children.

He says he is working to develop plan to resume illegally entry prosecutions of adults with children.

Meanwhile, Attorney General Jeff Sessions said in Reno, Nevada that federal prosecutors would continue to criminally prosecute adults caught crossing the border.

But Border Patrol agents must refer cases for prosecution.

More than 2,300 children were separated from their families before the order last week that is causing chaos at the border on how to implement it.

___

12:05 p.m.

A temporary tent shelter set up in far west Texas for immigrant children is close to its 360-person capacity.

Reporters were allowed Monday to briefly visit the shelter at the Tornillo border crossing, where more than 320 children ages 13 to 17 are being held.

About half are from Guatemala, and 23 of the children had been separated from adults who accompanied them across the U.S.-Mexico border.

The facility has a current capacity of 360. The tents are air conditioned, and a facility administrator told reporters that the main complaint he hears from children on site is that the tents get too cold sometimes.

According to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, boys and girls are kept in separate tents and use separate bathrooms and showers.

Reporters weren’t allowed to enter any tents holding children. Two girls who stopped briefly in front of reporters said that they were doing well.

___

12 p.m.

A Democratic lawmaker says an eastern Kansas nonprofit that has a contract with the federal government to care for unaccompanied minors is caring for 44 immigrant youth, nine of them under the age of 12.

House Minority Leader Jim Ward and former U.S. Attorney Barry Grissom are working to reunite the children with their parents.

Grissom has assembled a team of 10 lawyers to provide legal services to the children.

Grissom says they have been led to believe some of the children were separated from parents in a crackdown on illegal crossings of the U.S-Mexico border, but that is not confirmed.

Grissom, Ward, state officials and officials from The Villages, which operates five group homes home on a 400-acre (162-hectare) site outside Topeka, are set to meet on the issue Wednesday.

___

11:55 a.m.

A Democratic congresswoman says children as young as 4 and 5 are among a group of 22 unaccompanied migrant children being held in a Catholic Charities facility south of Miami.

U.S. Rep. Debbie Wasserman Shultz says conditions at the Monsignor Bryan Walsh Children’s Village she visited on Monday are much better than at the Homestead Shelter for Unaccompanied Children, which she toured Saturday.

That center is holding about 1,000 migrants, including 70 who’ve been separated from their parents.

President Donald Trump signed an order last week ending the policy, but many children remain separated.

Wasserman Shultz told reporters on Monday that she considers the practice of separating children from their parents “sadistic,” ”demonic,” and “outrageous.”

She noted that she saw two minor children who have newborns at the Children’s Village.

___

11:50 a.m.

U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions defended Trump administration immigration policies during a speech at a conference in Nevada while hundreds of protesters rallied outside.

Sessions told a convention sponsored by the National Association of School Resource Officers in Reno on Monday that the controversy over immigration is a “difficult and frustrating situation” that requires Congress to pass new legislation.

He says many children detained at the southern border were brought there by violent gang members, and that “children have indeed borne much of the burden of our broken immigration system.”

Sessions says the compassionate thing to do is protect children from violence and drugs, put criminals in jail and secure borders. He calls the alternative, open borders, “both radical and dangerous.”

No arrests were immediately reported outside, where demonstrators with signs, drums and a mariachi band waged a peaceful protest.

Some sat in a busy roadway for while police diverted traffic around the casino-hotel where Sessions was speaking.

___

11:25 a.m.

U.S. defense officials say the Trump administration has chosen two military bases in Texas to house detained migrants.

The officials identified the bases as Fort Bliss and Goodfellow Air Force Base and spoke on condition of anonymity because they were not authorized to speak on the record about a pending announcement.

Defense Secretary Jim Mattis had said on Sunday that two bases had been selected but he would not identify them.

One official said unaccompanied children detained after crossing the U.S. border would be sheltered at one of the bases and the other base would house families of migrant detainees.

Under the arrangement, the Defense Department would provide the land but the operations would be run by other agencies.

— Lolita C. Baldor and Robert Burns.

____

11:05 a.m.

A Republican congressman says unaccompanied migrant children housed at a Catholic Charities facility in South Florida are being treated “exceptionally well” and are “happy.”

U.S. Rep. Carlos Curbelo toured Catholic Charities Boystown south of Miami Monday morning.

He says some children were in classrooms and others were on a field trip to an aquarium.

Curbelo says the “children were smiling, they were happy.”

Curbelo says he opposed President Donald Trump’s policy of separating migrant children from family members detained at the U.S.-Mexico border. But he says the facility is doing a good job caring for 22 children.

Trump signed an executive order last week ending the policy, but many children remain separated.

Curbelo says he will work to find a permanent workable immigration policy.

___

11 a.m.

More than a dozen protesters are blocking a busy road in downtown Reno, Nevada, near where U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions is appearing to speak at a school safety conference.

The Monday morning demonstration includes several people holding a banner saying “No Human is Illegal” to call attention to Trump administration immigration policy and the separation of children and families at the U.S. border.

Reno police on bicycles have blocked traffic around the protesters near a downtown casino-hotel. Some demonstrators have promised to engage in peaceful civil disobedience and invite arrest.

Nearly two dozen Nevada groups in a progressive alliance tried last week to persuade the national school law enforcement group hosting the conference to withdraw Sessions’ invitation.

Mo Canady, executive director of the Alabama-based National Association of School Resource Officers, says that as the nation’s top law enforcement officer, Sessions has important information to share.

___

10:45 a.m.

A team of federal law enforcement officers entered the Immigration and Customs Enforcement building in Portland, Oregon, to secure government property as protesters continued a demonstration against Trump administration immigration policies.

Federal Protective Service spokesman Rob Sperling says officers entered the building during the early hours Monday. Protesters did not try to stop them.

Sperling says it’s a precautionary move, and there’s no indication that activists camped outside the facility have entered it.

Portland’s ICE headquarters has been the site of a round-the-clock protest since June 17. The occupation grew in size early last week and the building has been closed since Wednesday.

Sperling says there’s no time frame for when employees will return.

___

8:40 a.m.

A coalition of civil rights, religious and union activists opposed to President Donald Trump’s immigration policies are gearing up for a protest in Nevada outside a school safety conference where U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions is the keynote speaker.

Several of the protesters gathering for Monday’s rally outside a hotel-casino in Reno say they will engage in civil disobedience to bring attention to the separation of children and families at the U.S. border.

At least one, Bob Fulkerson, told The Associated Press he expects to be arrested.

Nearly two dozen Nevada groups in a progressive alliance tried unsuccessfully last week to persuade the national school law enforcement group hosting the conference to withdraw its invitation to Sessions.

Mo Canady, executive director of the Alabama-based National Association of School Resource Officers, said Sessions has important information to share with school resource officers as the nation’s top law enforcement officer.

___

8:25 a.m.

A U.S. congressman says he was turned away from trying to meet with detainees from the southern border crisis because of a chicken pox outbreak at the Northwest Detention Center in Tacoma, Washington.

The Tacoma News Tribune reports that U.S. Rep. Derek Kilmer, a Democrat, went to the prison Saturday after hearing that a number of migrants who were separated from their children after crossing the U.S.-Mexico border were transferred there from another federal prison in SeaTac.

Kilmer said he had official tours set up at both facilities but that it was canceled due to protest-related safety concerns.

And when the congressman tried to visit three detainees during the regularly scheduled visiting hours on Saturday, he was told that they were all quarantined due to chicken pox exposure.

___

10 p.m.

A Texas charitable organization says about 30 immigrant parents separated from their children after crossing the U.S.-Mexico border have been freed into its care, but they don’t know where their kids are or when they might see them again despite government assurances that family reunification would be well organized.

The released parents arrived Sunday at Annunciation House in El Paso.

The release is believed to be the first, large one of its kind since President Donald Trump signed an executive order Wednesday that preserved a “zero-tolerance” policy for entering the country illegally but ended the practice of separating immigrant parents and children.

Annunciation House Director Ruben Garcia says the parents were brought by bus after federal authorities withdrew criminal charges.

U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement offered no immediate comment.

Alix Tichelman indicted for second man’s death, report says

A former California prostitute who served three years for the death of a millionaire Google executive has been indicted by a Georgia grand jury on murder charges in a separate case, a report said.

Alix Tichelman, who was released from a Santa Cruz jail last year after pleading to involuntary manslaughter of Forrest Hayes, will be extradited from Canada to Fulton County, Georgia, Paul Howard, the Fulton County district attorney said, according to KSBW 8.

Tichelman, who is known in the media as “Call Girl Killer,” was indicted on murder charges for the 2014 heroin death of Dean Riopelle, a former boyfriend. She has denied any connection to his death, the station reported.

She recently told the station that she was clean and sober and working a normal job in Canada.

In the earlier case, Tichelman injected Hayes with heroin in November 2013 then left without seeking help when he passed out on the yacht, authorities said. Hayes had hired Tichelman several times before, and they were doing drugs and having sex the night he died, authorities said.

She has long maintained that Hayes died from an accidental overdose between two consenting adults.

Riopelle and Tichelman had been dating for about two and a half years and lived together, said Riopelle’s sister, Dee Riopelle.

An autopsy report listed his death as an accidental overdose of heroin, oxycodone and alcohol. Tichelman had told the dispatcher that he had been taking painkillers and drinking.

She told the station that she had nothing to do with Riopelle’s death.

The Associated Press contributed to this report

The Latest: Girl, 6, inspires national fund-raising effort

The Latest on the separation of immigrant children from their parents (all times local):

4:45 p.m.

After learning of separated migrant families at the U.S-Mexico border, a 6-year-old girl from Atlanta wanted to help.

Armed with lemonade, the girl went to work raising funds Sunday. His mother, Shannon Cofrin Gaggero, set a broad goal of $1,000, the Atlanta Journal-Constitution reports. After the first day, they raised more than $1,100.

Now —from the virtual fundraiser and physical lemonade stand— a total of more than $13,000 has been raised. More than 200 donations have rolled in for the Gaggeros family’s cause.

Proceeds will benefit the Refugee and Immigrant Center for Education and Legal Service, a nonprofit in Texas that offers free and low-cost legal services to immigrants.

Upon learning of separated families, many people in the U.S. raised money to help them. One Silicon Valley couple has raised more than $20 million.

___

4:15 p.m.

A group of mothers and fathers who were separated from their children after crossing the U.S.-Mexico border broke down in tears as they talked about the uncertainties of being reunited with their sons and daughters.

The five parents were among 32 who had been released from federal custody to the care of a Texas charitable organization in El Paso, Texas.

Speaking Spanish and all wearing ankle monitors, the parents told reporters during a news conference Monday that they don’t know when they might see their children again.

One mother from Guatemala was able to talk with a social worker in New York where her 4-year-old son was taken.

When she asked to speak with the boy, the social worker told her the child was angry and didn’t want to talk with her because he believed his mother had abandoned him.

The woman said she would not have come to the U.S. had she known her child would be taken from her.

___

3 p.m.

Legislation asking Louisiana Gov. John Bel Edwards to recall National Guard troops at the border until families who entered illegally are reunited with their children has fizzled.

New Orleans Democratic Sen. J.P. Morrell didn’t bring the measure up for Senate consideration before the special session adjourned Sunday night, amid a lack of support for it.

Louisiana has a three-person National Guard team and one helicopter at the Texas border. Edwards, a Democrat, decided the team will remain until mid-July as planned.

He says the crew had no role in separating families, a policy the Trump administration enacted and then reversed.

___

2:45 p.m.

Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker has repeatedly dodged questions about whether he supported President Donald Trump’s immigration policy at the Mexican border, saying it’s outside of his jurisdiction.

The Republican Walker skirted the issue Monday with reporters, declining to give an opinion.

Walker has frequently commented on immigration and other federal or international political issues, particularly in 2015 when he was running for president. Just over two months ago, Walker tweeted praise to Trump for “taking on illegal drugs, human trafficking, illegal firearms, and all the problems we see on our southern border.”

His re-election campaign is even paying for digital ads running on Facebook that voice support for sending National Guard troops to defend the southern border.

___

2:40 p.m.

New York state officials say they’re ready to provide social services to the estimated hundreds of immigrant children housed at New York foster-care facilities after being separated from their asylum-seeking parents.

Gov. Andrew Cuomo says Monday that state agencies can send public services providers to government-contracted foster care agencies that request help for children separated from parents after the families were caught crossing the southern border illegally.

The Democrat was joined at his Manhattan office by the heads of the state health and family services agencies and by immigrant advocates. He also announced that state services can be provided to children released to a foster family or to a relative living in New York state.

Cuomo has been highly critical of Republican President Donald Trump’s “zero tolerance” policy that results in the separation of asylum-seeking families.

___

2:30 p.m.

White House Press Secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders insists the administration’s reversal in referring parents crossing the border illegally with children for prosecution is only temporary because the government is running out of resources.

Sanders spoke to reporters at the White House after the head of U.S. Customs and Border Protection said he has stopped referring cases involving children for prosecution.

That’s after President Trump’s order that stopped the separation of children and their parents who cross the border illegally. Attorney General Jeff Sessions says the “no tolerance” policy is still in place, but there will be no one to prosecute without referrals.

Sanders says stopping the referrals is a temporary solution. She says it will only last a short amount of time because: “we’re going to run out of space, we’re going to run out of resources to keep people together.”

She called on Congress to change immigration laws.

___

1:50 p.m.

No arrests were made among protesters blocking a street outside a speech where U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions cast children at the nation’s southern border as victims of a broken immigration system.

Demonstrations outside the Peppermill hotel-casino were colorful, loud and peaceful.

An act of civil disobedience by more than 20 people who sat down in a crosswalk didn’t draw a police response.

Reno police Officer Travis Warren, a department spokesman, says officers only wanted to maintain safety, not arrest people.

Progressive Leadership Alliance of Nevada leader Bob Fulkerson says protesters got their point across.

Fulkerson calls separating children from families at the nation’s southern border an act of state-sponsored terror.

Sessions told a school safety conference it’s a difficult and frustrating situation.

The attorney general declared that more than 80 percent of the children crossing U.S. borders are “by themselves, without parents or guardians —often sent with a paid smuggler.”

_

1:40 p.m.

The head of U.S. Customs and Border Protection says an inability to process all asylum seekers at border crossings is temporary.

Commissioner Kevin McAleenan says the facilities were not built for such large numbers.

He says that some asylum seekers had to wait a day at four crossings, were turned away and told to return.

There are longer waits at San Diego’s San Ysidro crossing. He described it is an “outlier” with longer waits.

Asylum seekers who go to a specific border crossing are a different from the thousands of parents who were arrested crossing illegally with their children under a zero tolerance policy.

McAleenan says agents have temporarily stopped referring cases for criminal prosecution involving parents and children.

He says it’s because of President Trump’s order that called for children to stop being separated from their families.

___

1:35 p.m. Immigrant rights activists in Seattle are suing the Trump administration, saying it is unnecessarily prolonging the separation of asylum-seeking immigrants from their children.

The Northwest Immigrant Rights Project filed the lawsuit Monday in U.S. District Court in Seattle on behalf of three Central American migrants held in federal custody in Washington state, thousands of miles from where immigration officials have transferred their children. The lawsuit seeks class-action status on behalf of other immigrants separated from their children and detained in Washington state.

The organization says U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement has provided no information about whether or when the detainees’ asylum cases will move forward or when they’ll be reunited with their children.

Washington, California, New Jersey and at least eight other states have also announced plans to sue the administration over the separations this week.

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1:25 p.m.

A federal judge in Portland ordered that immigration attorneys be given access to more than 120 asylum seekers being held at the federal prison in Oregon.

U.S. District Judge Michael Simon on Monday granted an emergency order sought by the American Civil Liberties Union and the Innovation Law Lab, a nonprofit whose attorneys have been denied access to immigrants being held at the prison in Sheridan.

U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement transferred the immigrants to Oregon because other holding facilities have been overloaded since the Trump administration enacted a “zero tolerance” policy involving people entering the U.S. illegally.

The detainees are from 16 countries, but more than half are from India and Nepal.

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1:15 p.m.

Federal officials Monday ordered protesters to end their round-the-clock occupation of property outside the U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement office in Portland, Oregon.

Law enforcement officers began distributing notices to vacate late Monday morning. The several hundred protesters have so far ignored the demand.

The group rallying under the moniker Occupy ICE PDX wants to abolish ICE and end the Trump administration’s “zero tolerance” policy in which all unlawful border crossings are referred for prosecution.

Occupy ICE PDX last week called for similar occupations throughout the country, and demonstrators have responded in places such as New York, Los Angeles and Detroit.

Earlier Monday, federal law enforcement officers entered the Portland’s ICE headquarters to secure government property ahead of the vacate notice.

he protesters did not try to thwart officers.

Portland’s ICE headquarters has been the site of an occupation since June 17.

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12:55 p.m.

The head of U.S. Customs and Border Protection says he has temporarily stopped referring for criminal prosecution adults who cross the border illegally with children.

Commissioner Kevin McAleenan told reporters in Texas Monday he ordered referrals suspended within hours of President Trump’s executive order last week that stopped the practice of separating families.

He says that the zero tolerance policy remains in effect, but cases cannot be prosecuted because parents cannot be separated from their children.

He says he is working to develop plan to resume illegally entry prosecutions of adults with children.

Meanwhile, Attorney General Jeff Sessions said in Reno, Nevada that federal prosecutors would continue to criminally prosecute adults caught crossing the border.

But Border Patrol agents must refer cases for prosecution.

More than 2,300 children were separated from their families before the order last week that is causing chaos at the border on how to implement it.

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12:05 p.m.

A temporary tent shelter set up in far west Texas for immigrant children is close to its 360-person capacity.

Reporters were allowed Monday to briefly visit the shelter at the Tornillo border crossing, where more than 320 children ages 13 to 17 are being held.

About half are from Guatemala, and 23 of the children had been separated from adults who accompanied them across the U.S.-Mexico border.

The facility has a current capacity of 360. The tents are air conditioned, and a facility administrator told reporters that the main complaint he hears from children on site is that the tents get too cold sometimes.

According to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, boys and girls are kept in separate tents and use separate bathrooms and showers.

Reporters weren’t allowed to enter any tents holding children. Two girls who stopped briefly in front of reporters said that they were doing well.

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12 p.m.

A Democratic lawmaker says an eastern Kansas nonprofit that has a contract with the federal government to care for unaccompanied minors is caring for 44 immigrant youth, nine of them under the age of 12.

House Minority Leader Jim Ward and former U.S. Attorney Barry Grissom are working to reunite the children with their parents.

Grissom has assembled a team of 10 lawyers to provide legal services to the children.

Grissom says they have been led to believe some of the children were separated from parents in a crackdown on illegal crossings of the U.S-Mexico border, but that is not confirmed.

Grissom, Ward, state officials and officials from The Villages, which operates five group homes home on a 400-acre (162-hectare) site outside Topeka, are set to meet on the issue Wednesday.

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11:55 a.m.

A Democratic congresswoman says children as young as 4 and 5 are among a group of 22 unaccompanied migrant children being held in a Catholic Charities facility south of Miami.

U.S. Rep. Debbie Wasserman Shultz says conditions at the Monsignor Bryan Walsh Children’s Village she visited on Monday are much better than at the Homestead Shelter for Unaccompanied Children, which she toured Saturday.

That center is holding about 1,000 migrants, including 70 who’ve been separated from their parents.

President Donald Trump signed an order last week ending the policy, but many children remain separated.

Wasserman Shultz told reporters on Monday that she considers the practice of separating children from their parents “sadistic,” ”demonic,” and “outrageous.”

She noted that she saw two minor children who have newborns at the Children’s Village.

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11:50 a.m.

U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions defended Trump administration immigration policies during a speech at a conference in Nevada while hundreds of protesters rallied outside.

Sessions told a convention sponsored by the National Association of School Resource Officers in Reno on Monday that the controversy over immigration is a “difficult and frustrating situation” that requires Congress to pass new legislation.

He says many children detained at the southern border were brought there by violent gang members, and that “children have indeed borne much of the burden of our broken immigration system.”

Sessions says the compassionate thing to do is protect children from violence and drugs, put criminals in jail and secure borders. He calls the alternative, open borders, “both radical and dangerous.”

No arrests were immediately reported outside, where demonstrators with signs, drums and a mariachi band waged a peaceful protest.

Some sat in a busy roadway for while police diverted traffic around the casino-hotel where Sessions was speaking.

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11:25 a.m.

U.S. defense officials say the Trump administration has chosen two military bases in Texas to house detained migrants.

The officials identified the bases as Fort Bliss and Goodfellow Air Force Base and spoke on condition of anonymity because they were not authorized to speak on the record about a pending announcement.

Defense Secretary Jim Mattis had said on Sunday that two bases had been selected but he would not identify them.

One official said unaccompanied children detained after crossing the U.S. border would be sheltered at one of the bases and the other base would house families of migrant detainees.

Under the arrangement, the Defense Department would provide the land but the operations would be run by other agencies.

— Lolita C. Baldor and Robert Burns.

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11:05 a.m.

A Republican congressman says unaccompanied migrant children housed at a Catholic Charities facility in South Florida are being treated “exceptionally well” and are “happy.”

U.S. Rep. Carlos Curbelo toured Catholic Charities Boystown south of Miami Monday morning.

He says some children were in classrooms and others were on a field trip to an aquarium.

Curbelo says the “children were smiling, they were happy.”

Curbelo says he opposed President Donald Trump’s policy of separating migrant children from family members detained at the U.S.-Mexico border. But he says the facility is doing a good job caring for 22 children.

Trump signed an executive order last week ending the policy, but many children remain separated.

Curbelo says he will work to find a permanent workable immigration policy.

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11 a.m.

More than a dozen protesters are blocking a busy road in downtown Reno, Nevada, near where U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions is appearing to speak at a school safety conference.

The Monday morning demonstration includes several people holding a banner saying “No Human is Illegal” to call attention to Trump administration immigration policy and the separation of children and families at the U.S. border.

Reno police on bicycles have blocked traffic around the protesters near a downtown casino-hotel. Some demonstrators have promised to engage in peaceful civil disobedience and invite arrest.

Nearly two dozen Nevada groups in a progressive alliance tried last week to persuade the national school law enforcement group hosting the conference to withdraw Sessions’ invitation.

Mo Canady, executive director of the Alabama-based National Association of School Resource Officers, says that as the nation’s top law enforcement officer, Sessions has important information to share.

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10:45 a.m.

A team of federal law enforcement officers entered the Immigration and Customs Enforcement building in Portland, Oregon, to secure government property as protesters continued a demonstration against Trump administration immigration policies.

Federal Protective Service spokesman Rob Sperling says officers entered the building during the early hours Monday. Protesters did not try to stop them.

Sperling says it’s a precautionary move, and there’s no indication that activists camped outside the facility have entered it.

Portland’s ICE headquarters has been the site of a round-the-clock protest since June 17. The occupation grew in size early last week and the building has been closed since Wednesday.

Sperling says there’s no time frame for when employees will return.

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8:40 a.m.

A coalition of civil rights, religious and union activists opposed to President Donald Trump’s immigration policies are gearing up for a protest in Nevada outside a school safety conference where U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions is the keynote speaker.

Several of the protesters gathering for Monday’s rally outside a hotel-casino in Reno say they will engage in civil disobedience to bring attention to the separation of children and families at the U.S. border.

At least one, Bob Fulkerson, told The Associated Press he expects to be arrested.

Nearly two dozen Nevada groups in a progressive alliance tried unsuccessfully last week to persuade the national school law enforcement group hosting the conference to withdraw its invitation to Sessions.

Mo Canady, executive director of the Alabama-based National Association of School Resource Officers, said Sessions has important information to share with school resource officers as the nation’s top law enforcement officer.

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8:25 a.m.

A U.S. congressman says he was turned away from trying to meet with detainees from the southern border crisis because of a chicken pox outbreak at the Northwest Detention Center in Tacoma, Washington.

The Tacoma News Tribune reports that U.S. Rep. Derek Kilmer, a Democrat, went to the prison Saturday after hearing that a number of migrants who were separated from their children after crossing the U.S.-Mexico border were transferred there from another federal prison in SeaTac.

Kilmer said he had official tours set up at both facilities but that it was canceled due to protest-related safety concerns.

And when the congressman tried to visit three detainees during the regularly scheduled visiting hours on Saturday, he was told that they were all quarantined due to chicken pox exposure.

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10 p.m.

A Texas charitable organization says about 30 immigrant parents separated from their children after crossing the U.S.-Mexico border have been freed into its care, but they don’t know where their kids are or when they might see them again despite government assurances that family reunification would be well organized.

The released parents arrived Sunday at Annunciation House in El Paso.

The release is believed to be the first, large one of its kind since President Donald Trump signed an executive order Wednesday that preserved a “zero-tolerance” policy for entering the country illegally but ended the practice of separating immigrant parents and children.

Annunciation House Director Ruben Garcia says the parents were brought by bus after federal authorities withdrew criminal charges.

U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement offered no immediate comment.

UN seeks new funding pledges for Palestinian refugees

The United Nations implored member countries Monday to fill a critical funding gap that the Trump administration created by sharply cutting the U.S. contribution to a program that helps Palestinian refugees across the Middle East.

The U.N. held a conference to raise money for basic services — from food assistance and medical care to sanitation — for 5 million refugees in the Gaza Strip, the West Bank, Jordan, Lebanon and Syria.

After the session, the United Nations was still tallying how much was pledged by which countries against this year’s shortfall of $250 million facing the U.N. Relief and Works Agency for Palestinian Refugees, which leads the relief efforts.

Pierre Krahenbuhl, the agency’s director, said a 50 percent funding cut by the United States, the program’s top donor, is endangering basic services such as food assistance in Gaza and medical clinics spread among the five areas, while about 500,000 children may not be able to start the school year.

“The situation of Palestinians is defined by great anxiety and uncertainty, first because Palestinian refugees do not see a solution to their plight on the horizon,” he said at a briefing before the conference.

In Gaza, nearly 2 million men, women and children already are experiencing extreme shortages of water and electricity amid tensions that have worsened between the Palestinians and Israel since President Donald Trump opened a U.S. Embassy in Jerusalem.

His administration announced in January that it was withholding $65 million of a planned $125 million funding installment for the relief agency.

At the time, Trump tweeted that he saw no reason to spend so much American money in return for what he called “no appreciation or respect” from Palestinians.

Agency spokesman Christopher Gunness has said the actual cut was around $300 million because the U.S. had led the agency to believe it would provide $365 million in 2018. The U.S. government released $60 million so UNRWA wouldn’t shut down, but made clear that U.S. donations would be contingent on major reforms.

State Department spokeswoman Heather Nauert said last week that the agency needs to “determine a way to better manage its budgeting and its finances.”

The agency was created after the war that followed the birth of Israel in 1948, with about 700,000 Palestinians living there either fleeing or being forced from their homes. The UNRWA now faces its worst crisis in nearly seven decades, Krahenbuhl said.

In a report to the Security Council earlier this month, U.N. Secretary-General Antonio Guterres said the desperate humanitarian situation in Gaza is compounded by the potential suspension of U.N. programs, which are “a lifeline for Palestinians.”